Classic movie references in classic movies part 2

Part 2 is here! 😀
Let’s crack on!

Ralph Bellamy – In His Girl Friday (1940), Walter (Cary Grant) says Bruce (Bellamy) ‘looks like that fella in the movies, you know, Ralph Bellamy’.

Grand Hotel (1932) – In The Apartment (1960), when Baxter comes home, he sits down to watch Grand Hotel. After endless commercials, he gives up and turns off the TV.

Goodbye Mr Chips (1939) – In On the Town (1949), Lucy (Alice Pearce) says ‘Goodbye Mr Chip’ to Chip (Frank Sinatra).

Boris Karloff – In Arsenic and Old Lace (1944), Raymond Massey plays Jonathan Brewster, the character originally played Boris Karloff on stage. Because the play ran for so long, Karloff was still doing it while filming began so they cast Raymond Massey instead. As a j0ke, Jonathan Brewster is described as looking like Boris Karloff.

Casablanca (1942) – There are countless Casablanca references in pop culture, but I think my favorite is the one in The Two Mrs Carrolls (1947). I’m not even going to say what it is, in case you haven’t seen it, because I don’t want to spoil it. Let’s just say, my friend Denise and I were watching this together and we both started laughing our eyebrows off.

That’ll be all from me! Happy Sunday, everyone!

Classic movie references in classic movies part 1

I love movie references of all kinds. I’ve done movie references in music before, so I thought this time, I might do one about classic movie references IN classic movies. Here are just some of my favorites:

The Philadelphia Story (1940) – In Double Indemnity (1944), Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) tells Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) his name is spelt with ‘two FFs, like in Philadelphia, you know, the story’, to which she replies ‘What story?’. ‘The Philadelphia Story’, he says. Always a fangirl moment for me.

Gilda (1946) – In The Big Heat (1953), when Dave Bannion (Glenn Ford) is about the leave the bar, the song Put the Blame on Mame from Gilda is playing in the background. Glenn Ford was, of course, the male lead in Gilda.

The Lost Weekend (1945) – In The Apartment (1960), when Mr Dobisch and Mr Kirkeby are talking about Baxter and Miss Kubelik having a little toot, Mr Kirkeby says ‘Toot? More like a lost weekend!’. Both were written and directed by Billy Wilder.

Archie Leach – You know, Cary Grant’s real name. That everyone mentions as a joke in nearly all of his movies.

The Awful Truth (1937) – In Bringing up Baby (1938), Susan (Katharine Hepburn) refers to David (Cary Grant) as ‘Jerry the nipper’, his nickname in The Awful Truth (1937). David replies ‘She’s making all this up out of motion pictures she’s seen!’

More movie references next weekend!

Raw Deal (1948)

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Joe Sullivan (Dennis O’Keefe) is finally getting out of prison. He took the rap for his friend Rick, played by the 1948 Villain-in-Residence Raymond Burr (remember Pitfall (1948)?), who has now set up a deliberately flawed escape plan for him, to try and get rid of him for good. Pat (Claire Trevor), Joe’s girl and the movie’s narrator, helps him escape and the two of them kidnap Ann (Marsha Hunt), the social worker who’s been visiting Joe. This leads to an inevitable love triangle set in the midst of endless chasing, running away, mystery, danger and doom.

Anthony Mann’s Raw Deal is exactly that. Raw. Tough. No-nonsense. Unlike most noirs, there’s no backstory to help you sympathize, or at least, empathize with its characters. You don’t even know where you stand with Joe. What did he do? Is he guilty? Innocent? Is he as big a cad as he seems? We don’t know. What you see is all you’re going to get, deal with it.

Mann’s masterful direction is beautifully complemented by John Alton’s stunning cinematography. Raw Deal looks incredible. It takes your regular ‘shadows and dim light’ motif to a whole new level. In certain scenes, we almost feel like we’re watching some sort of psychological, gothic thriller. It’s amazing. Mann and Alton often worked together, and I’m going to be talking about another one of their movies soon.

Raw Deal is one of the all-time great unsung noirs. And you know me, I like to root for the underdog and the underrated – maybe I should do a series of reviews under that title? I’ll think about that.

 

Coming up this week…

Hi everyone!

Been a bit busy lately, but I’ve had a few ideas for upcoming posts. Stay tuned for a brand new review next Friday, and something fun for the weekend! I’ve also been nominated for blogging awards by fellow bloggers and friends, so I’ll get on with that at some point as well!

Love,
Carol