DOUBLE BILL #20 (final): Crossfire (1947) and Border Incident (1949)

It is with sadness that I announce that this shall be my last ever Double Bill. I have had the most fun talking about and comparing all of these movies, and I feel this is the right time to end it. There are only so many movies that are similar! Don’t worry though, I’ve got something …

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DOUBLE BILL #19: The Invisible Man (1933) and The Wolfman (1941)

Horror is fascinating. Horror characters are fascinating. Whether they’re human, or monsters in the classic sense, the many complexities that you find in all of them are equally disturbing and wonderful. And The Invisble Man (1933) and The Wolfman (1941) are two of the finest in the bunch. The Invisible Man (1933) starts in an …

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DOUBLE BILL #18: Love Affair (1939) and An Affair to Remember (1957)

It’s not unusual for a director to remake their own movie. Hitchcock did it, Cecil B. DeMille did it (twice!), and Leo McCarey did it. Love Affair (1939) and An Affair to Remember (1957) are two of the greatest romantic films of all time and while it’s easy to make that claim about a whole …

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DOUBLE BILL #17: Thrill of a Romance (1945) and Million Dollar Mermaid (1952)

Summer’s here, so I thought I’d go for a summer-themed Double Bill this month. And yeah, there’s a lot to choose from, but in the end, I went with… Esther Williams! And why not? Why not watch a couple of Esther Williams films, you know, the ones where she’s in the pool all the time? They’re …

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DOUBLE BILL #15: Hell’s Highway (1932) and Ladies They Talk About (1933)

I will never not love Pre-Code. I am constantly in awe of it and I am always amazed at how much they got away with. And because it’s Pride Month, I thought I’d take a look at two of the many (yes) films that dealt with LGBT issues or showed LGBT characters in one way …

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DOUBLE BILL #14: Animal Crackers (1930) and Horse Feathers (1932)

Marx Brothers films are the wackiest things ever put on screen. They might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but I, for one, adore them. And while Animal Crackers (1930) and Horse Feathers (1932) are not as iconic as, say, Duck Soup (1933), they’re still as zany and full of hilarious gags and one-liners. In …

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DOUBLE BILL #13: Witness for the Prosecution (1957) and 12 Angry Men (1957)

Courtroom dramas never disappoint. They’re tense, gripping, dramatic and emotional and, more often than not, they grab you by the throat and they don’t let go until the very end. Witness for the Prosecution (1957) and 12 Angry Men (1957) are two of the most iconic and greatest examples of this. In Witness for the …

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DOUBLE BILL #12: The Public Enemy (1931) and Angels With Dirty Faces (1938)

James Cagney once said about acting, ‘Learn your lines, find your mark, look ‘em in the eye and tell ‘em the truth.’ And he did. That was the thing about him. You always believed him, no matter what he was doing. And it was fascinating to watch. The Public Enemy (1931) and Angels With Dirty …

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DOUBLE BILL #11: Merrily We Live (1938) and My Man Godfrey (1936)

In many ways, Merrily We Live (1938) is the forgotten cousin of My Man Godfrey (1936). They are strikingly similar, plot-wise and character-wise, and yet, only one of them is a classic. In Merrily We Live, Mrs Kilbourne (Billie Burke in her only Oscar-nominated performance) has a habit of hiring ‘tramps’ as servants, much to …

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DOUBLE BILL #10: Red-Headed Woman (1932) and Baby Face (1933)

Pre-Code. The forbidden era where anything goes. Wonderfully risqué, daring and freeing, Pre-Code is a goldmine of genres, thoughts and attitudes, all rushing to get their point across before the enforcement of the Hays Code in 1934. Red-Headed Woman (1932) and Baby Face (1933) are two of the era’s most iconic films and they are strikingly …

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